Archive for the ‘civil rights’ Category:

The Advocate kind of had it right in it's last issue…

Written on January 25th, 2010 by Suzanneno shouts

..when gays and lesbian can give money, then politicians will smooch them up right and left and make promises out of their ass. After the election we once again are the red-headed cousin – the one you invite for family dinner because you have to but still hope that she won’t show up for dinner. Obama and others were full of promises but they just haven’t delivered. Last year we had a few good legislative days in Dover, but nationwide – forget it. So, if I will give money to candidates this year, it will be only those with a proven track record and in local races – as for the other big shots — forget it.

PROVE TO ME that you are electable and that you will deliver legislation that is EQUAL – because different is not equal.

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Fetal rights out-weight the rights of women?

Written on March 30th, 2009 by redwaterlilyno shouts

(note – I had to remove the video, it kept making IE hang up)

The website in the above video and the stories below came to my attention through a discussion on OutQ radio, a GLBT Satellite radio station on Sirius. The fact is that all these anti-abortion people that fight for the right of fetuses are taking away a women’s right to choose how and when and where to give birth. In some cases, as the one described below, it even rates the life of the fetus higher then that of the mother. I am outraged by these stories and even though they are a few years old, this stuff still happens.

  • In 1987, Angela Carder was twenty-five weeks pregnant, and cancer had metastasized to her lung.
  • Administrators of George Washington University Hospital – who were also the liability risk managers feared a lawsuit by pro-life activists.
  • They convened a court hearing at the hospital
  • Angela’s family and her husband as well as her physician opposed a c-section because it was very unlikely that she would survive such procedure.
  • Despite medical testimony that such a procedure would most likely Angela’s life, an order was issued forcing her to have an emergency c-section.
  • Neither Angela Carder nor her baby survived.

And then there is this one

  • Laura Pemberton had given birth via c-section before. When she became pregnant again, no hospital would let her give natural birth.
  • She decided to give birth to her child at home in Florida.
  • While she was in labor, a Sheriff came to her house
  • Doctors were in the process of getting a court order to force her to have a c-section because of a less then 5 percent chance of ruptures during delivery.
  • The sheriff took her into custody during active labor, they strapped her legs together and forced her to undergo a c-section at the hospital.
  • During a later lawsuit she was told that fetal rights outweighed hers.
  • She gave later birth to three more children — naturally

Or this one

  • Melissa Ann Rowland was charged with murder after she gave birth to twins, one of them stillborn.
  • Melissa was told by doctors that she should have a c-section, but she refused to, because she had been through the procedure and had been cut a lot
  • Melissa did finally have a c-section, but, according to prosecutors, not soon enough.
  • They theorized that the second baby may have survived an earlier c-section.

Town Hall meeting on Relationship Recognition in Delaware

Written on January 9th, 2009 by Pegno shouts

January 15, 2009
Time: 6:30 PM
Location: Unitarian Universalist Society of Mill Creek
579 Polly Drummond Hill Rd., Newark DE

Civil unions, domestic partnerships, marriage- every week there are new stories about ways that states are recognizing (or withdrawing)the rights of same-sex couples to establish and secure their families. On January 15, come hear Sharon McGowan of the national ACLU LGBT Rights project talk about the state of relationship recognition in the U.S. and the different shapes that recognition takes. Her talk will be followed by a”town hall” meeting for Delawareans to share their ideas on how we can win legal rights for our families here in Delaware!

January 10th – Nationwide DOMA Protests – Join the Impact – Delaware

Written on January 9th, 2009 by Pegno shouts

January 10, 2009
Nationwide DOMA Protests
Dover City Hall – 15 E. Loockerman St., Dover, DE 19901
Time: 1:30 PM

COME OUT!

Christmas, Milk, and whatever else there is

Written on January 6th, 2009 by Suzanneno shouts

Christmas at our house was rather quiet but very enjoyable.  While I miss the big, huge family holidays, the way they used to be when I was a child, I also enjoy the smaller, more quiet celebrations that I have with my son and my partner.  Christmas Day we went to friends of ours that have become much like a family and we also spent new Years Eve with them.  Though, I don’t think I will ever get used to New Years Eve in the United States.  It is definitely a much more exciting celebration in Germany.  We don’t usually start to party until PM and the party really doesn’t start fully until midnight – after all, we celebrate the New Year and not the outgoing one.  Parties rarely end before 3 in the morning, because at midnight we go outside and set fireworks off – imagine an entire city of 3 million people engulfed by fireworks.  Growing up there wasn’t a house on my street that did not have its own fireworks (oh and – before I forget – we never had accidents either).  I remember standing on the roof of our five story house and shotting bottle rockets into the air.  It was awesome.  The next morning I would get up and watch the New Years Ski Jumping on TV (something I miss a lot here too) and at some point we would go outside, the smell of gun powder still hovering over the city.  New Years Day was always a very quiet day – people were tired, hung over, busy cleaning up from last night’s party, and busy removing the old and letting in the new.  I can’t even describe the mood that day – sadness mixed in with joy – and a general curiosity of what lays ahead.  This day (the fifth of January) also signaled the end of the school break – by the 5th we had to go back to school (that’s also the day many of us took their Christmas tree down and finally removed the Christmas presents from the living room).

 

We went to he movies once during the holidays – to watch Milk, the movie about Harvey Milk, the first openly gay elected official.  I wrote about that movie before.  The movie was very well done and Sean Penn did an excellent job.  Upon exiting the movie one of my friends stated that the movie was awesome or something along those lines – I responded that I can’t describe a movie that is a true and sad story with that word – instead I found it aggravating, saddening, and empowering.  Whenever I watch movies like that, I know that the fight isn’t over – not for a long time – and that unless we keep fighting,t here will never be true equality.  I also know that there is something everybody interested in true equality can do to help out.  After the movie my partner and I felt very drained and we both stated that we needed to do something “very gay/lesbian” rather then look at the straight people crossing our paths and be angry at them.  So we did the one thing we knew would lighten out moods and we went to Lambda Rising, a book store for gays and lesbians in Rehoboth Beach.  We purchased, among others, a movie about the Times of Harvey Milk, a book about Harvey Milk, and a book about the AIDS Quilt (the founder of the quilt was on Harvey Milk’s campaign team).  I am glad the store didn’t have a shirt saying “Don’t feed the straight people” — I believe I would have been very tempted to buy it.  I know, not all heterosexuals are narrow minded bigots, but still – after watching movies like that it just stirrs up something inside of me.  I don’t think any heterosexual person will ever truly understand how gays and lesbians feel when faced with discrimination against us and knowing that this discrimination and hatred has taken the lives of some of our brothers and sisters – and they are brothers and sisters even if there may not be anything else we have in common then our sexual orientation.

What else?  Not much – i think it is time to get off the soap box for the moment.  more later — maybe.

Speech by Harvey Milk

Written on November 14th, 2008 by Suzanneno shouts

The Hope Speech

You see there is a major difference–and it remains a vital difference–between a friend and a gay person, a friend in office and a gay person in office. Gay people have been slandered nationwide. We’ve been tarred and we’ve been brushed with the picture of pornography. In Dade County, we were accused of child molestation. It’s not enough anymore just to have friends represent us. No matter how good that friend may be.

The black community made up its mind to that a long time ago. That the myths against blacks can only be dispelled by electing black leaders, so the black community could be judged by the leaders and not by the myths or black criminals. The Spanish community must not be judged by Latin criminals or myths. The Asian community must not be judged by Asian criminals or myths. The Italian community should not be judged by the mafia myths. And the time has come when the gay community must not be judged by our criminals and myths.

Like every other group, we must be judged by our leaders and by those who are themselves gay, those who are visible. For invisible, we remain in limbo–a myth, a person with no parents, no brothers, no sisters, no friends who are straight, no important positions in employment. A tenth of a nation supposedly composed of stereotypes and would-be seducers of children–and no offense meant to the stereotypes. But today, the black community is not judged by its friends, but by its black legislators and leaders. And we must give people the chance to judge us by our leaders and legislators. A gay person in office can set a tone, can command respect not only from the larger community, but from the young people in our own community who need both examples and hope.

The first gay people we elect must be strong. They must not be content to sit in the back of the bus. They must not be content to accept pabulum. They must be above wheeling and dealing. They must be–for the good of all of us–independent, unbought. The anger and the frustrations that some of us feel is because we are misunderstood, and friends can’t feel that anger and frustration. They can sense it in us, but they can’t feel it. Because a friend has never gone through what is known as coming out. I will never forget what it was like coming out and having nobody to look up toward. I remember the lack of hope–and our friends can’t fulfill that.

I can’t forget the looks on faces of people who’ve lost hope. Be they gay, be they seniors, be they black looking for an almost-impossible job, be they Latins trying to explain their problems and aspirations in a tongue that’s foreign to them. I personally will never forget that people are more important than buildings. I use the word “I” because I’m proud. I stand here tonight in front of my gay sisters, brothers and friends because I’m proud of you. I think it’s time that we have many legislators who are gay and proud of that fact and do not have to remain in the closet. I think that a gay person, up-front, will not walk away from a responsibility and be afraid of being tossed out of office. After Dade County, I walked among the angry and the frustrated night after night and I looked at their faces. And in San Francisco, three days before Gay Pride Day, a person was killed just because he was gay. And that night, I walked among the sad and the frustrated at City Hall in San Francisco and later that night as they lit candles on Castro Street and stood in silence, reaching out for some symbolic thing that would give them hope. These were strong people, people whose faces I knew from the shop, the streets, meetings and people who I never saw before but I knew. They were strong, but even they needed hope.

And the young gay people in the Altoona, Pennsylvania and the Richmond, Minnesota who are coming out and hear Anita Bryant on television and her story. The only thing they have to look forward to is hope. And you have to give them hope. Hope for a better world, hope for a better tomorrow, hope for a better place to come to if the pressures at home are too great. Hope that all will be all right. Without hope, not only gays, but the blacks, the seniors, the handicapped, the us’es, the us’es will give up. And if you help elect to the central committee and more offices, more gay people, that gives a green light to all who feel disenfranchised, a green light to move forward. It means hope to a nation that has given up, because if a gay person makes it, the doors are open to everyone.

So if there is a message I have to give, it is that if I’ve found one overriding thing about my personal election, it’s the fact that if a gay person can be elected, it’s a green light. And you and you and you, you have to give people hope. Thank you very much.

Why write about Proposition 8 if we live in Delaware?

Written on November 14th, 2008 by Suzanneno shouts

Because it affects all gays and lesbians, no matter where in the United States they live.  I am sick and tired of being made to feel like a second class citizen.  I am sick and tired of being asked to be happy with little handouts – it’s kind of like sitting at the kiddie table and not being allowed at the big table. 

I get tears in my eyes when I hear bigoted idiots talk about me, my loved ones, and my friends, as if we are evil and vile.  What happens to my gay and lesbian brothers and sisters in other parts of the United States matters to me – while we may not have much else in common – we share something that is with us every day, no matter where we go and what we do.

Straight people like to ask us to understand them and to be tolerant.  They only say it so we still spend our money in their stores and restaurants and so our money still goes to their families.  Screw that.  I prefer a gay business over one owned by straights any day!

I think every obviously anti-gay business needs to be boycotted.

Some people may think that asking for a boycott of El Coyote, a San Francisco Restaurant whose floor manager gave money to the Mormon Church to pass Proposition 8, is asked too much.  However, 10% of the money that floor manager, Marjorie Christofferson, makes goes to the Mormon Church as required  tithe.  Those 10 percent as well as the one hundred dollars she agave IN ADDITION to the Mormon church was money that she received in parts from El Coyote’s gay and lesbian clients.

And then there comes a half-assed press conference – well, she didn’t convince me.

Watch the press conference below

 

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Californians Against Hate

Written on November 14th, 2008 by equalitydriveno shouts

LOS ANGELES, CA – Fred Karger, Founder of Californians Against Hate, today filed a Sworn Complaint with the Enforcement Division of the Fair Political Practices Commission (FPPC). In the complaint he accused The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS) of not reporting numerous non monetary contributions to ProtectMarriage.com – Yes on 8, A Project of California Renewal I.D. # 1302592.

Californians Against Hate.

Harvey Milk (cross posted to redwaterlily.com)

Written on November 14th, 2008 by Suzanneno shouts

I rarely ever go to the movies.  However, I know I will be going and watching “<a href=”http://www.filminfocus.com/focusfeatures/film/milk”>Milk</a>”, in Theaters starting November 26, 2008.

Excerpt from the film’s website:  <em>In 1977, Harvey Milk was elected to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors, becoming the first openly gay man to be voted into major public office in America. His victory was not just a victory for gay rights; he forged coalitions across the political spectrum. From senior citizens to union workers, Harvey Milk changed the very nature of what it means to be a fighter for human rights and became, before his untimely death in 1978, a hero for all Americans.</em>

After serving less then a year as city supervisor, Harvey Milk was assassinated, together with Mayor George Moscone, on November 27, 1978.  The killer, Dan White, was also a city supervisor.  White had resigned from his job but wanted it back.

This movie isn’t just about gay rights but it is about the fight for civil rights and I believe that every person should watch this movie.  Are you planning on watching MILK?  If yes, what is your motivation for wanting to watch it?

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Harvey Milk

Written on November 13th, 2008 by Suzanneno shouts

I rarely ever go to the movies.  However, I know I will be going and watching “Milk“, in Theaters starting November 26, 2008.

Excerpt from the film’s website:  In 1977, Harvey Milk was elected to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors, becoming the first openly gay man to be voted into major public office in America. His victory was not just a victory for gay rights; he forged coalitions across the political spectrum. From senior citizens to union workers, Harvey Milk changed the very nature of what it means to be a fighter for human rights and became, before his untimely death in 1978, a hero for all Americans.

After serving less then a year as city supervisor, Harvey Milk was assassinated, together with Mayor George Moscone, on November 27, 1978.  The killer, Dan White, was also a city supervisor.  White had resigned from his job but wanted it back. 

This movie isn’t just about gay rights but it is about the fight for civil rights and I believe that every person should watch this movie.  Are you planning on watching MILK?  If yes, what is your motivation for wanting to watch it?